Residents 2000 – 2013 2017-10-18T17:21:29+00:00

Residents 2000 – 2013

2009 – 2013, Burton Court West at The Blakeford at Green Hills
2000 – 2009, The West End Home For Ladies at Vanderbilt Place

Miss Mary Elizabeth Allen,
The West End Home For Ladies,
2818 Vanderbilt Place

Mary Elizabeth Allen
July 15, 1911 – June 18, 2004
Marital Status: Never Married

Place of Birth: Nashville, Tennessee
Parents: Benjamin Hamblin Allen and Bessie Ehrdard Allen
Spouse: N/A

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies, May 3, 1993
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site: Mount Olivet Cemetery

Family References

Cousin: Cornelia Gist Chitwood of Nashville, Tennessee

Biography

Miss Allen was educated in Nashville Public Schools, attending Clemons Elementary and graduating from Hume-Fogg High School. Upon completion of her Bachelor of Science degree in 1934 from George Peabody College for Teachers, Miss Allen began her thirty-two year teaching career in Nashville Public Schools. For twenty-six years she taught at Caldwell Elementary and then taught for six years at Clemons Elementary. In 1966, Miss Allen retired from teaching and became a member of the Metropolitan Nashville Retired Teachers Association.

Miss Allen was a member of the Women’s Club of Nashville and volunteered her service for twenty-seven years as a Pink Lady at Baptist Hospital. She served on several services, but her longest service was as Chairman of the Flower Room Volunteers. Other volunteer time was given during membership drives for Nashville Community Concerts as Captain of a group of workers.

Prior to her admittance to The West End Home For Ladies, Miss Allen had resided at the Stephen Foster Apartments for fifteen years. She gave up a five room lower apartment, cookouts in the yard, many friends ad a wonderful RN. In her own words: “What I have found at The West End Home has far outweighed all of these. I love my room, which a friend calls my retreat, with all my treasures in it; my next door neighbor as well as those down the hall. I drive my car and am free to come and go at will. There are three well balanced meals served each day in a beautiful dining room by a staff that goes the extra mile to make me happy. Also, I am free to invite friends to share a meal at any time. My buddies from the Auxiliary have been most attentive and we have shared many experiences together. Since I have no immediate family members that can assist me, I have been grateful for them. When the weather permits, I like to take a book and sit on one of the garden benches near the fountain, unafraid as the property is secured by a cyclone fence. Each time I drive in, I think: This is my home! I’m so glad I decided to move here.”

Miss Allen was a lifelong member of Belmont Heights Baptist Church and Amica Sunday School Class. At the time of her application to The West End Home for Ladies, she had been attending services at Belmont Heights for seventy-two years.

Miss Allen enjoyed crafts, Bingo type games and special artists and she spent many hours sitting in the “oasis” reading, weather permitting.

Miss Allen was a contributor to The West End Home For Ladies Neswletter. A column included below entitled Tricycle Friends described a lifelong friendship she shared with her cousin and two sisters who lived across the street from her family. They met at the ages of five and seven and maintained their friendship for over eighty years.

Memories of Our Ladies

Each of the Ladies had a “Buddy” from the Auxiliary of The West End Home For Ladies. Their Auxiliary buddies were their special friends, visiting often, taking the Ladies out for some fun, and sometimes joining them for meals. Miss Allen’s Buddy was Grace Bathrick. Mrs. Bathrick describes Miss Allen as “interesting and somewhat opinionated.” Miss Allen had taught one of Mrs. Bathrick’s great-aunts during her years as a schoolteacher.

From the August 2000 edition of the West End Home For Ladies Newsletter

Tricycle Friends

One of the happiest times during my July birthday celebrations was a Dutch Treat at the Picnic Café with two of my tricycle friends. Yes, I said my tricycle friends – sisters. We lived across the street from each other when they, my cousins and I were five and seven years old. A tent was pitched in their front yard so all the neighborhood children gathered there to play, to skate or to kick-the-can in the street (so few cars then – no danger). We three followed my cousin with her beautiful bouncing natural curls to Clemens School envying her since our mothers had curled our hair either on curling irons heated in the fireplace or rolled on strips of cloth, neither of which rarely held up until we got to school.

My cousin and I moved to a new neighborhood and the sisters to Florida. After two years they returned and located in Sterling Court. As teens we spent many an afternoon at the bridge table, having enjoyed the most beautiful and delicious lunch which their mother prepared.

Their father, a very witty person, took us on a trip to Chicago. At dinner he was our dance partner – being the only man in our group. Often ion a Sunday afternoon, their parents took us for a “drive” (neither of our families had a car at that time). Of course, we drove down Church Street to look in the store windows at the latest fashions.

Once they drove us up Nine Mile Hill by a night club at which Francis Craig’s Orchestra and Pee Wee, the mascot, were appearing.

Time passed and both friends married and moved away – one to Cedar Hill, Tennessee and the other to Louisville, Kentucky. Soon after, we made a trip to Louisville to visit the newlyweds – their first guests, I remember at dinner that night the friend apologizing for serving chocolate cookies with fresh strawberries because her new husband liked them. Anything to keep them happy was certainly agreeable with us. She also planned a two table bridge game one night.

My cousin and I remained single but kept in touch with both childhood friends. She was a secretary to the manager of an insurance company and I to the classroom as a teacher. Though separated by miles, we kept in touch. Eventually both couples returned to Nashville and we have enjoyed many good times in each of their homes, especially on holidays when they remembered their single tricycle friends.

Some thirty years ago, my cousin married a wonderful Christian gentleman. They made numerous trips together to Europe, to the Holy Land, to Hawaii, to the Western states and to Gatlinburg before my cousin was stricken with Alzheimer’s. Her husband visits her everyday in the nursing home where she has been for the last five years.

Now, both friends are widows living across the hall from each other at Park Manor. So only three tricycle friends are able to get together once a year near the two July birthdays. This year as we lunched together, we no doubt received curious glances from the very casually dressed “luncheoners”. We were dressed as ladies lacking only hats and gloves. After all, that was the accepted way when we were young ladies going out for lunch, shopping downtown, or going to a church service. Once we lunched together at the Hermitage Grill where Francis Craig’s Orchestra was appearing.

Though the sisters now each use a cane and I a walker, we have many happy memories of our eighty-year friendship.

Can any of you match it?

By: Mary Elizabeth Allen

Lula Belle Parker Austin
March 26, 1908 – November 12, 2007
Marital Status: Married

Place of Birth: Louisiana
Parents: John Wesley Parker and Arcadia McCray Parker
Spouse: Howell Clay Austin

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies June 5, 1985
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site: Mount Olivet Cemetery

Family References

Siblings: Gennie Sweeney of Beverly Hills, California

Children: Barbara Austin Donoho of Portland, Tennessee

Grandchildren: Michael B. Donoho of Portland, Tennessee

Niece: Elizabeth Parker Lyons Ghrist

Biography

Mrs. Austin was one of six siblings, having two brothers and three sisters. Mrs. Austin attended one year at Louisiana Tech and continued her education at Touro Nursing School in New Orleans, Louisiana graduating with a degree in nursing. She was employed as a nurse for over forty years including four years at the Old Woman’s Home. Mrs. Austin was a member of the Baptist Church from childhood. She attended services at Woodmont Baptist Church and was a member of the Schatz Sunday School Class.

After her admission to The West End Home For Ladies, she continued to volunteer in The West End Home For Ladies Health Care Center. Mrs. Austin also volunteered many hours of service at Trevecca Health Care, Nashville School for the Blind, and the Tennessee Conservation League. While volunteering at the Tennessee Conservation League, she received a plaque for her outstanding service. Mrs. Austin enjoyed reading, playing cards, Bridge was once her favorite, and traveling to California and Florida.

Ruth Lillian Gearhart Beaver
July 20, 1918 – May 14, 2008
Marital Status: Married

Place of Birth: Northumberland, Pennsylvania
Parents:
Spouse: Eugene N. Beaver

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies December 27, 1993
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site:

Biography

Mrs. Beaver was one of four siblings, having two brothers and one sister. One brother was killed in an accident at the age of four. Her parents divorced when Mrs. Beaver was twelve years old and her mother raised the children as a single parent. Mrs. Beaver was a graduate of Sunbury High School in Pennsylvania.

An active volunteer, Mrs. Beaver could often be found working at her church, the schools attended by her six children and at nursing homes. She was President of the Women’s Group at her church and later served as a District Officer. Mrs. Beaver’s fondest memory was of a month long trip to Taiwan. After her admission to The West End Home For Ladies, Mrs. Beaver enjoyed reading, working jigsaw puzzles, playing Bingo, attending the many outings, and Bible classes.

Erby Lee Sweeney Black
February 26, 1914 – October 17, 2009
Marital Status: Divorced 1953

Place of Birth: Dover, Tennessee
Parents: Robert Whitfield Sweeney and Velura Alice Fitzgerald Sweeney
Spouse: Vernon L. Black

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies in 1990
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place, later the Blakeford at Green Hills
Burial Site: Mrs. Black donated her body to Vanderbilt Anatomical Donation Program

Family References

Children: Gayle B. Ingram of Hermitage, Tennessee, JoAnne Hedgepath of Nashville, Tennessee and Marie Randolph of Nashville, Tennessee

Grandchildren: Shane Randolph, Drew Randolph, Lynne Hedgepath, and Lisa McDonald

Great-Grandchildren: Trey Pewitt

Biography

Mrs. Black was employed as an Apartment Manager at Sherwood Terrace Apartments in Nashville, Tennessee, where she was known as “Mama B” and remembered with much love. After attending services at First Christian Church on Franklin Road for twenty-eight years, Mrs. Black moved her membership to Madison First Christian Church approximately three years prior to her admission to The West End Home For Ladies. Mrs. Black enjoyed many hobbies, especially sewing and dressing antique dolls.

Prior to Mrs. Black’s admission to The West End Home For Ladies, she was friends with two of the residents, Mrs. Lula Belle Austin and Miss Elizabeth Cowles. Mrs. Black stated that she was “eager to join them to the finish!”. In later years, Mrs. Black enjoyed pet visits and watching game shows. In April 2009, the Ladies moved to a specially constructed wing at The Blakeford in Green Hills and The West End Home For Ladies at Vanderbilt Place was permanently closed. The Foundation continued to support the Ladies for the remainder of their lives.

Memories of Our Ladies

Jean Farris, Past President of the West End Home For Ladies Board of Directors remembers Mrs. Black as “a high-spirited lady who always seemed to be aware of “news” before everyone else. Her mind was sharp as a tack and she loved to laugh and watch her shows on TV. We miss the mischievous twinkle in her eye.”

Shelley Childress Cabell Blitch
May 11, 1920 – January 27, 2012
Marital Status: Married

Place of Birth: Nashville, Tennessee
Parents: George Craighead Cabell and Lewis Maney Cabell
Spouse: William Homer Blitch, Jr. of Georgia

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies in 1998
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies, 2818 Vanderbilt Place, later in The Blakeford at Green Hills
Burial Site: Woodlawn Memorial Park

Family References

Children: Cabell Blitch Shoffner of Ferndale, Washington

Grandchildren: John Claiborne Evans

Biography

Mrs. Blitch was an only child. She was educated in Atlanta, Memphis, and New Orleans from first thru third grades. Beginning in fourth grade, she attended Stokes Elementary where she was able to ride her pony to school. Mrs. Blitch was a graduate of Willa B. High School and Ward Belmont School for Girls, junior College. On a trip to Sea island, Georgia, a graduation present from her parents, she met her future husband. They were married on January 30, 1943 and almost immediately after the wedding he left for training in the Air Force Cadet program. After completing his training, he taught French Cadets. When the war was over, Mr. and Mrs. Blitch returned to Nashville, Tennessee where he graduated from Vanderbilt University. Mr. Blitch passed away on March 9, 1984.

Mrs. Blitch was employed by Michael Corzine and Company as a Wedding Gift Advisor. She was a member of Christ Church where she taught 3rd grade in Sunday School and was President of the Rector Aides. Mrs. Blitch was a member of the Lynnbrook Garden Club, the Nashville Cotillion Club and was a volunteer for the Girl Scouts of America.

She enjoyed traveling and visited Mexico, the Bahamas, Portugal, Spain, England, Wales, Scotland, Ireland, and New York City. During her leisure time Mrs. Blitch enjoyed playing tennis, golf, and horseback riding.

In later years, Mrs. Blitch enjoyed shopping, good food and wine, occasional music programs, playing Bridge, and reading. In April 2009, The West End Home For Ladies at Vanderbilt Place was permanently closed and the Ladies were moved to a specially constructed wing of The Blakeford at Green Hills. The Foundation continued to support the Ladies for the remainder of their lives.

Charlene LaRue Shirley Bomer
January 24, 1927 – June 13, 2007
Marital Status: Divorced

Place of Birth: Eastland, Texas
Parents: Franklin Homer Shirley (Dick Shirley) and Willie Mae Kellett Shirley Mathis
Spouse:

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies in 2000
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site: The Columbarium at Vine Street Christian Church

Family References

Siblings: Billie Joe Shirley of Lawn, Texas, Samuel Kaye Shirley of Elkland, Missouri, Daniel Edward Shirley, and Gloria Jean Shirley Kyle

Children: John Daniel Bomer of Irving, Texas, Ronald Louis Bomer of Dripping Springs, Texas , and Shirley Carol Bomer Doidge of Nashville, Tennessee

Grandchildren: Andrea Brooksie Bomer Baker of Fort Worth, Texas, Cara Christine Doidge of Nashville, Dillon R. Jeremy Bomer of San Antonio, Texas, Rachel Michelle Bomer Burcham of Holly Spring, North Carolina, and Benjamin Cole Bomer of Austin, Texas.

Biography

Mrs. Bomer was a graduate of Imperial High School and lettered in volleyball. After reading a notice about the U.S. Cadet Nurse Corps in 1944, she enrolled in the Lubbock Memorial Hospital School of Nursing in the U.S. Nurse Cadet Corps. She graduated in 1947 with a Registered Nursing degree and classmates who remained her closest friends throughout her life. Mrs. Bomer was employed as a Registered Nurse for over sixty years in doctor’s offices, hospitals, nursing homes, public schools, public health departments, and home health agencies. In 1994 , Mrs. Bomer retired from Baptist Hospital in Nashville, Tennessee. After retirement, she worked as a camp nurse in Alabama at Camp Laney and organized first aid stations for Habitat for Humanity in Nashville, Tennessee.

Mrs. Bomer was a member of Vine Street Christian Church and had attended services there for eleven years prior to her application to The West End Home For Ladies. She served as a Deacon of the Church and was an active volunteer in Church activities. Mrs. Bomer was a member of the Local Outreach Committee, the Anne Williamson Sunday School Class, and later, the Disciples Sunday School Class. She worked with the Church’s Room in the Inn ministry and Habitat for Humanity projects, as well as volunteering for several years to work in the Church office.

Mrs. Bomer was a fan of the Dallas Cowboys and the Tennessee Titans. After her retirement, she enjoyed hiking, reading, taking field trips with the Prime Timers and traveling to Texas for family reunions and holidays. In addition to all these activities, Mrs. Bomer found time to write a column for The West End Home For Ladies Newsletter, published by the Ladies. She described her childhood in a column included below entitled Memories of The Past from the August 2000 Newsletter

Memories of The Past

Growing up in West Texas oilfields during the Dust Bowl and Depression years, gratefully my father always had a job. His salary was $30.00 a month. We lived in furnished shot-gun style houses with no electricity, plumbing or water.

Daddy worked 12-14 hours a day. I have no memory of his job description – he drilled wells for crude oil and laid pipelines to deliver crude oil to tanks. Companies bought the oil to truck out to refineries. It was a dirty job. He came home daily with oil soaked clothing that had to be soaked in gasoline before Mother could wash them over a scrub board using lye soap.

Life was hard and rough. The wind and dirt would blow for days and days. The Pecas River and a small lake were both salt water, but we swam in them anyway. Daddy hauled water in weekly for household use. We always had a milk cow and chickens for their eggs and to eat.

My parents were happy, loving and wonderful to us. My two brothers helped with the care of the chickens, milked the cow and carried large buckets of water into the kitchen. I followed my mother’s footsteps and helped with the meals, cleaning the dishes, doing the laundry, sewing and hanging the wash to dry.

Summertime we kicked off our shoes, walked and explored prairie dog burrows and watched for rattlesnakes.

A windchanger to keep the radio batteries charged was truly a blessing. Mother and Daddy would listen to the Grand Old Opry every night at top volume.

By: Charlene Bomer

Elizabeth Shute Cowles
April 19, 1910 – December 16, 2003
Marital Status: Never Married

Place of Birth: Franklin, Tennessee
Parents:
Spouse:

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies January 10, 1985
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site:

Biography

Miss Cowles was one of two siblings, having one sister. Miss Cowles attended Tarbox Elementary School and was a graduate of Hume Fogg High School. She was also a graduate of Cumberland University in Lebanon, Tennessee. After graduation she was employed in the Office of the Registrar for five years.

Miss Cowles was a secretary for the General Board of Education of the United Methodist Church in the departments of General Church School Work and Music Curriculum for 50 years prior to her retirement in 1975. Her work with the field of church music was in the organization of the National Fellowship of Methodist Musicians.

Miss Cowles was a member of Belmont United Methodist Church. She did part-time work with her church and for seventeen years, was the writer and editor of the church newsletter.

During her leisure time, Miss Cowles enjoyed reading, sewing, and listening to “good” music.

The Ladies of the West End Home published a newsletter,written entirely by the Ladies. Miss Cowles’ contributions to the newsletter included a description of the 1999 Christmas season and celebrations at The Home entitled “The Closing of a Century”.

From the January 2000 edition of The West End Home For Ladies Newsletter

The Closing of a Century

The Christmas season opened early this year when Old Santa and Mrs. Claus came out with the makings of the most beautiful Christmas tree we have ever had. Guests were greeted by lovely door wreaths being nothing short of elegant.

Excitement really began to pick up Sunday, December 5th when the Home Auxiliary ladies sponsored their annual Christmas tea.

Other events during the season included the annual music by the Vanderbilt Choir, the Christmas devotional given by Belmont United Methodist minister, the Reverend John Collett, and a country ham breakfast was served one morning with guests from the Commission On Aging.

The day before Christmas Eve, we, the residents had a surprise visit from Santa and Mrs. Claus. These festivities put us all in the Christmas spirit for the Big Day as it should be.

Other events during the holiday season included music selections by a chorus of high school students fro the University School of Nashville, Christmas carols by Patrick Calvert, guitarist, Bill Sleeter, who accompanied himself on the piano, and the Shrine Chanters. We had special visits from Scout troops 2040 and 324.

All of these brought us to the end of a century filled with unmatched progress.

Now we begin 2000 as a New Year of many unknowns throughout the world.

By: Elizabeth Cowles

Ida Hildred Dingess
July 19, 1915 – January 10, 2002
Marital Status: Married

Place of Birth: Logan, West Virginia
Parents:
Spouse: Woodrow (Woody) Harlin Dingess

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies August 31, 1996
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial site:

Biography

Mrs. Dingess had five siblings including a twin sister. She and her husband were married for forty-nine years and had four children, two sons and two daughters. Mrs. Dingess said, “I knew the first time I laid eyes on him, he was the man I was going to marry.”

Mrs. Dingess was employed in a dime store. During her leisure hours, Mrs. Dingess enjoyed watching Jeopardy, How To Be A Millionare, and baseball games on television. She also enjoyed playing bingo and taking long leisurely rides around the city.

The most important part of her life was her children and grandchildren. Mrs. Dingess stated, “Nothing takes that special place in your heart more than family.” Her family donated new furniture and carpet for the activity room in The West End Home For Ladies Health Care Center and also donated carpet for the Director of Nursing’s office in 2000 to show their appreciation for the care given to Mrs. Dingess.

Velma C. Doss
November 4, 1927 – October 17, 2005
Marital Status: Never Married

Place of Birth: Macon County, Tennessee
Parents: Thomas Jefferson Doss and Effie Dora Driver Doss of Lafayette, Tennessee
Spouse:

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies September 1, 2005
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site:

Family References

Nephew: Gale Doss of Macon County, Tennessee

Biography

Miss Doss’ father was a Macon County, Tennessee farmer. A graduate of Macon County High School, Miss Doss went on to graduate from the Baptist School of Nursing. She was a member of the Baptist Church. Miss Doss was employed in The Old Woman’s Home Health Care Center for over twenty years, and after her retirement continued to help whenever she was needed.

The West End Home For Ladies stopped accepting new residents in 2002, but made an exception for Miss Doss due to her many years of dedicated service to the Old Woman’s Home.

Martha Stewart Laurent Fuqua (Marie)
March 21, 1910 – October 8, 2001
Marital Status: Married

Place of Birth: Nashville, Tennessee
Parents: Mr. and Mrs. Edward Laurent
Spouse: Vincent Fuqua

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies May 25, 1997
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site:

Biography

Mrs. Fuqua moved to Clarksville, Tennessee as a child with her family. She was the only child of Mrs. and Mrs. Edward Laurent. Mr. Laurent was a pharmacist and was the owner of the local Pharmacy Store in Clarksville. Upon her marriage to Vincent Fuqua, she moved to Franklin, Tennessee. Martha and Vincent had one son who died at an early age leaving Mrs. Fuqua the responsibility of raising her three grandchildren.

Mrs. Fuqua was the owner of the Green Door Gift Shop in Franklin, Tennessee and was a member and manager of the Williamson County Historical Society for over 15 years.

Spending her spare time rearing her grandchildren and running a business did not give her very much free time, but she made sure that her grandchildren went to Sunday School and Church and that their lives were as active and full as she could possibly achieve.

Memories for the Ladies of the West End Home:

“We are wonderfully blessed to have such a loving and compassionate lady living at our Home.” quote from the West End Home For Ladies Newsletter September 2000

Katie Lou Gatlin
February 28, 1904 – December 15, 2001
Marital Status: Never Married

Place of Birth: Franklin, Tennessee
Parents: John Lazarus Gatlin and Leticia Porter Gatlin
Spouse:

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies August 26, 1982
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2811 West End Avenue, later at The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site:

Family References

Nephews: J.T. Gatlin of Nashville, Tennessee, Gary Gatlin of St. Petersburg, Florida and Ricky Gatlin of St. Petersburg, Florida.

Biography

Miss Gatlin was one of two siblings, having one sister. Although she was the 25th cousin of Larry Gatlin, a country music artist, she never met him. She stated: “I’d like to be his old maid aunt.”

Miss Gatlin was a graduate of Franklin High School. She began teaching before she graduated from High School in a one room schoolhouse where she taught 1st thru 8th grades. In the winter, she would have to get up early and go to the school to light the pot-bellied stove. While maintaining her teaching career, she furthered her education, eventually earning her Masters degree from Middle Tennessee State University. Miss Gatlin taught at Peytonsville Elementary School in Williamson County for most of her 43 years of teaching. She also taught Art and History at Bethesda High school. Miss Gatlin was a member of the Presbyterian Church.

A sketch of The West End Home For Ladies drawn by Miss Gatlin was used as the cover of the Resident’s Handbook. Miss Gatlin filled her days at The Home painting, writing, sewing, reading and writing a book about her experiences.

Memories of Our Ladies:

Gladys Bruce, a longtime friend of Mrs. Gatlin, shared a story with the Ladies of the Home: “Once when Katie had just had her styled, a first grader told her she looked so pretty – – just like George Washington.” “Katie had a great sense of humor and she would laugh and talk about the funny things that would happen when she was teaching.”

A former student stated: “Never has any teacher meant so much and contributed as much as you did to our family. Thank you for your love and support.”

Marietta Rowland Greer
August 24, 1922 – September 26, 2009
Marital Status: Divorced

Place of Birth: McMinnville, Tennessee
Parents: J.M. Rowland and Maude Adair Rowland
Spouse:

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies September 25, 1987
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place, later in The Blakeford at Green Hills
Burial Site: Mt. Olivet Cemetary

Family References

Siblings: Elizabeth Rowland Hughes

Children: Bill Greer and Elizabeth G. Abrams

Grandchildren: Dawn Wynn of Norman Park, Georgia

Nephew: Clifford Rowland

Biography

Mrs. Greer and her sister grew up on a farm and she retained many happy memories of their childhood. A private person, Mrs. Greer described herself as “not overly friendly” and as a person who enjoys “doing her own thing”. Mrs. Greer was employed by Saint Thomas Hospital in Accounts Receivable for twenty years and by Vanderbilt Hospital in Patient Affairs for seven years. She was a member of First Lutheran Church. Mrs. Greer was a volunteer for several years for the Diabetes Center and Community Services. Her hobbies included reading, listening to music, playing Bridge, cross-stitch, sewing, quilting and outdoor activities. She also enjoyed working with ceramics and porcelain products.

While living in The West End Home For Ladies, Mrs. Greer enjoyed Bingo, watching CNN, pet visits and visits with family and friends. In April 2009, the Ladies moved to a specially constructed wing in The Blakeford at Green Hills and The West End Home For Ladies at Vanderbilt Place was permanently closed. The Foundation continued to support the Ladies for the remainder of their lives. Mrs. Greer’s sister was also a resident of The Blakeford, but was not one of the West End Home Ladies.

Lillian Mina Harley
May 13, 1919 – April 5, 2013
Marital Status: Never Married

Place of Birth: Denver, Colorado
Parents: Thomas and Lida Harley
Spouse:

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies April 6, 1994
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place, later in The Blakeford at Green Hills
Burial Site: Center Point Methodist Cemetery in Lawrence County, Tennessee

Family References

Siblings: George Harley, Orville Harley, Ethel Crisan and Velma Betcher

Niece: Marie Bossard of Oakland, Michigan

Biography

Miss Harley was one of five siblings, having two brothers and two sisters. She lived in Michigan until 1954 when she moved to Nashville, Tennessee due to a chance meeting at a church convention. Miss Harley met four sisters from Lawrenceburg, Tennessee and they bonded immediately and became lifelong friends. These sisters urged Miss Harley to move to Tennessee, which she did and all five of them lived in an apartment/house in Nashville.

Miss Harley served as a companion to sixty-five people during her career. She stated, “I’ve met the most interesting and wonderful people during my lifetime. I even had a chance to serve Harold and Gertrude Vanderbilt.” Miss Harley eventually met and was employed as a companion by Mrs. James A Cayce until her death. After Mrs. Cayce’s death, Miss Harley remained in the employment of her daughter, Mary Elizabeth Cayce for 32 years. Miss Harley and Miss Cayce were close friends for the remainder of their lives. Miss Harley was a member of The Friend’s Church.

Miss Harley enjoyed traveling and visited California, Seattle, Washington, and Yellowstone National Park. She also enjoyed taking month-long yearly trips to Michigan visiting her sister.

Miss Harley and Miss Cayce entered The West End Home For Ladies together. The Director of The Home assured Miss Harley that she was no longer employed by Miss Cayce and that all the ladies were treated equally. While living at The Home she enjoyed playing Bingo, attending weekly Bible study, music programs, arts and crafts, dinning out, exercise, and pet visits. Miss Harley especially enjoyed the Vanderbilt Choir performances and the piano music of Bill Sleeter. In April 2009, The West End Home For Ladies at Vanderbilt Place was permanently closed and the Ladies were moved to a specially constructed wing of The Blakeford at Green Hills. The Foundation continued to support the Ladies for the remainder of their lives. Miss Harley was the last West End Home Lady.

Memories of Our Ladies

Past President of the Board of Directors of The West End Home For Ladies, Gray Thornburg, described Miss Harley as “Always the ultimate lady. Quiet, lovely and always wore a smile. She laughed often, smiled incessantly and was loved by many. Miss Lillian was a sweet, gentle soul who always had a mischievous twinkle in her eye and a smile on her face.”

Mrs. Eleanor Hersh (1909-2012)
100th Birthday Celebration
The Blakeford at Green Hills

Eleanor May Herts Hersh
November 15, 1909 – May 27, 2012
Marital Status: Married

Place of Birth:  Oakland, California
Parents:  Arthur Herman Herts of London, England and Mary Elizabeth Van Alstine Herts of Ellersburg, Washington
Spouse:  Louis Hersh

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies October 30, 1985
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place, later in The Blakeford at Green Hills
Burial Site:  Cremation

Family References

Siblings:  Virginia Herts Ballard of Australia

Children:  Ann Hersh Gilbert

Biography

Mr. Herts grew up in London and moved to Canada at the age of 21.  Mrs. Hersh’s paternal grandfather was married three times and had a total of fourteen children.  He was originally from Germany and moved to England as a young man, where he worked as a distributor of Scott’s Cod Liver Oil Emulsion and also German wine.  Mrs. Hersh’s maternal grandfather was a cattle rancher in Ellersburg.  After her maternal grandparents marriage ended, her grandmother moved to Portland, Oregon with her young daughter, where she attended medical school.  Upon graduation, she established a general medicine practice in Portland.

Mrs. Hersh’s parents were married in 1906 and lived in Oakland, California until moving to Portland, Oregon when she was a small child.  Mrs. Hersh had memories of living in Portland, Seattle and Los Angeles before the age of ten. Her father was in the automotive business and traveled extensively on business, normally including his family in the trips.  In 1919 her father received an eighteen month travel assignment sailing through Asia and Australia.  Her parents decided that traveling would be more educational than attending a regular school in the United States and took the family on the trip.  Her memories included visiting Hawaii, riding in a rickshaw and staying in the Imperial Hotel while in Tokyo before proceeding to Shanghai.  She and her younger sister, were enrolled in the Shanghai girl’s school and traveled to school each day via rickshaw.  After leaving Shanghai, her family traveled to Manila, Hong Kong, Singapore, Java, Batavia, and Australia.  While visiting Java, her family rode donkeys up rocky slopes to the mouth of a live but inactive volcano.  She remembered the crater being about the size of a football field with a gravelly ash type surface containing several opening spouts of boiling lava.  After arriving in Sydney, Mrs. Hersh and her sister were enrolled in boarding school for six weeks before traveling to Melbourne where they attended boarding school for approximately three months.  After leaving Australia, they traveled to New Zealand where a hotel maid taught Mrs. Hersh and her sister to knit.  On their return trip to the United States, they stopped in Tahiti.  After their return, they resided in New York where Mrs. Hersh and her sister attended boarding school and they later resided in Tarrytown where she attended Tarrytown Grammar School.  In 1922, her father signed another contract for the same trip with the addition of India.  The family traveled to England where the girls and their mother remained while their father continued on his trip.  They were educated by tutors during this period.  After their return to the United States, the girls were enrolled in boarding school and traveled with their parents in the summer visiting Holland, Brussels, Switzerland and Paris.  Mrs. Hersh got her first pair of ballet slippers while visiting Paris.  From 1923 to 1939, her family resided in England.  She and her sister attended a boarding school there until the age of eighteen.  Neither of them attended college.

Mrs. Hersh’s first job was volunteer work at the age of sixteen, selling tickets to the Derby Day horse races at Epsom Downs to benefit St. Dunston’s organization for the blind.  Her next job was “selling those vibrating machines you would put around your belt“.  She kept this job for several years until opening her own business in London.  Mrs. Hersh and a friend, May MacDonald, opened a shop on Baker Street selling hand knit sweaters.  Their customers included the Duke of Windsor and Wallace Simpson.

She married Louis Hersh in 1943 and moved to Nashville, Tennessee where their daughter was born.  Three years later, they moved to New York City where Mrs. Hersh designed knitting and needlepoint patterns and sold sweaters to Lord and Taylor before becoming one of the first female traveling sales representatives selling craft kits to hobby shops in the states surrounding Pennsylvania.  She traveled with her husband who at that time was a traveling shoe representative.  Mr. Hersh passed away in September 1959 leaving her with a 15 year old daughter to raise.  Mrs. Hersh was also caring for her mother who was living with them.  In order to stay at home, Mrs. Hersh opened a yarn shop in her home.  Around 1972, Mrs. Hersh moved to Nashville to open a yarn shop at Chester’s in Green Hills.  When the shop closed, she returned to school and received a certificate in Occupational Therapy and began teaching crafts to Senior Citizens all over the city of Nashville.  After working for another yarn shop in Green Hills, Mrs. Hersh went to work at Angel Hair Yarns where she sold yarn, aided customers with their knit projects and taught classes.  In addition to her work in shops, she taught knitting and needlework in adult evening classes at Hillsboro High School and worked with schoolchildren from Ensworth School.

Mrs. Hersh was Jewish and attended services at The Temple.  She loved going to Friday night services, the Tuesday Golden Age programs and knitting with the Temple ladies on Tuesday afternoons.  Mrs. Hersh volunteered in the library of the Gordon Jewish Community Center where she performed clerical work and catalogued books.  Earlier, she helped inventory and catalogue all of the books in the library at The Temple after it’s expansion and renovation.  She also did telephone work for the National Council of Jewish Women and the Buz-a-Bus operated by the Council.  Other volunteer work through the years included taking menus to patients at Saint Thomas Hospital on Sundays and staffing the desk at Cheekwood’s Botanic Hall, also on Sundays.  She was an active volunteer at The Temple collecting donations to fund relief for Hurricane Katrina.  At the age of 97, Mrs. Hersh stated “If I could drive, I’d do a lot more volunteer work.  People don’t volunteer enough here.  You can always find something to do.”

While living at The West End Home For Ladies, she enjoyed cultural activities, music, daily exercise class, knitting, playing bridge, and good food.  Mrs. Hersh enjoyed mental stimulation and kept up with local and world news.  She enjoyed taking walks and especially enjoyed the pet visits.  In April 2009, the Ladies moved to a specially constructed wing of The Blakeford at Green Hills and The West End Home at Vanderbilt Place was permanently closed.  The Foundation continued to support the Ladies for the remainder of their lives.

Excerpt from the April 1998 West End Home For Ladies Newsletter written by Mrs. Hersh:

“To quote one of my retired friends:  She told me the best day of the week for her was the day she went to help her husband in in his business “Because I get dressed up and put on makeup, it makes me feel good and I enjoy that”.  This is the reason why I continue to work – I am well groomed, I meet people of all ages and walks of life – most of them younger than I am and it is stimulating for me.  It keeps me up to date on current affairs and I can relate to my nieces and nephews on their level.”

Memories of Our Ladies

In the words of her daughter:  “My mother was full of curiosity and playfulness.  She was creative and wise.  She was stubborn and feisty.  She was industrious and tried to get the most from life.  She was gregarious and loved being with people, especially people younger than she was.  She was traditional and at the same time modern.”

Each of the Ladies had a “Buddy” from the Auxiliary of The West End Home For Ladies.  Their Auxiliary buddies were their special friends, visiting often, taking the Ladies out for some fun, and sometimes joining them for meals.  Mrs. Hersh’s Buddy was Nettie Jane Langhans, Past President of the Auxiliary.  Mrs. Langhans’ shared her memories of Mrs. Hersh:  “We went everywhere:  Franklin, Green Hills, had our nails done at The French Shoppe.  Mrs. Hersh went more than I did!  As Mrs. Hersh became more stooped, I had to bend way over to see her face and interact with her at lunch or during a visit.  But that didn’t stop Mrs. Hersh from doing things and enjoying life.  When there was no one to take her where she wanted to go, Mrs. Hersh road the bus to get around, up into her 90s.  She swam at the Jewish Community Center; I bought rubber shoes for her to wear at the pool.  I had to work to think of things to get for her, to do for her because she was so active; she did and bought whatever she wanted.  She loved books, so that was a good gift.  And she enjoyed music, so I took her to the Symphony (Mrs. Hersh bought the tickets), to plays, museums, art exhibits, etc.” 

Memories of the Ladies of the West End Home from the West End Home For Ladies Newsletter May 2000:  “A regular whirlwind, Eleanor is one person that everyone looks up to and respects for her enthusiasm, energy, and positive attitude about life for a senior citizen.”

Louise Gatlin Hobbs
December 7, 1916 – January 4, 2006
Marital Status: Married

Place of Birth:  Peytonsville, Tennessee
Parents:  Will C. Gatlin and Ina Ridley Gatlin
Spouse:  Virgil Hobbs, Jr.

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies in 1999
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site:  Mount Olivet Cemetery

Biography

Mrs. Hobbs’ father was a farmer and grocer.  An only child, Mrs. Hobbs moved with her family at the age of six to Franklin, Tennessee where she attended Franklin Grammar School through the third grade.  She completed fourth thru eight grades at Schwab Elementary and is a graduate of Central High School in Nashville.  At the age of eighteen, Mrs. Hobbs held her first job as an employee of one of the first female dentists in the State of Tennessee.  During World War II, she worked at Vultee Company as an inspector of airplane parts.

After the war, Mrs. Hobbs was employed by Life and Casualty Insurance Company, where she remained until her retirement.  In 1950, she married Virgil Hobbs, a member of the United States Air Force.  She and her husband enjoyed traveling throughout the United States.  They would read an article in a magazine about a particular city and decide to leave home the very next morning to visit that city.  Mr. Hobbs passed away on June 26, 1993.

Mrs. Hobbs was a lifelong member of the Church of Christ and she enjoyed volunteering at the Senior Citizen’s Center.  Her hobbies included needlework, handwork, reading, and visiting with friends on the telephone.

Mrs. Hobbs was a friend of Mrs. Walter Stokes, Sr. , a former member of the Board of Directors of The West End Home For Ladies, and had on numerous occasions accompanied Mrs. Stokes on her visits to The Home.  Each of the Ladies had a “Buddy” from the Auxiliary of The West End Home For Ladies.  Their Auxiliary Buddies were their special friends, visiting often, taking the Ladies out for some fun, and sometimes joining them for meals.  Mrs. Hobbs’ Buddy was Grace Bathrick.  Mrs. Bathrick remembers Mrs. Hobbs as “delightful“.  Mrs. Bathrick learned that Mrs. Hobbs was a long-time best friend of her father’s long-time secretary.

Lizzie Burt Dobbs Young Hutchinson
April 12, 1917 – November 28, 2011
Marital Status: Married

Place of Birth:  Woodbury, Tennessee
Parents:  Joseph E. Young and Margaret Bell Todd Young
Spouse:  Isacc Newlan Hutchinson

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies in 2000
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place, later in The Blakeford at Green hills
Burial Site:

Family References

Grandchildren:  Brian Shaw of Old Hickory, Tennessee

Biography

Mr. Hutchinson passed away in 1972.  They had five children-all sons.  Mrs. Hutchinson was employed as a factory worker and was a lifelong member of the Baptist Church.

While living at The West End Home For Ladies, Mrs. Hutchinson enjoyed pet visits, visiting with friends and family in her room and talking about life with her children.  She really enjoyed music and would keep a beat with her head, hands and feet.  She did not enjoy the television and preferred quiet.  In April 2009, the Ladies moved to a specially constructed wing of The Blakeford at Green Hills and The West End Home For Ladies at Vanderbilt Place was permanently closed.  The Foundation continued to support the Ladies for the remainder of their lives.

Mary McCullough Keith
September 24, 1921 – February 24, 2007
Marital Status: Never Married

Place of Birth:  Nashville, Tennessee
Parents:  Walter Keith and Josephine Boensch Keith
Spouse:

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies July 12, 1990
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site:  Mount Olivet Cemetery

Family References

Great-Grandparents:  Mr. and Mrs. Samuel J. Keith

Siblings:  Walter Keith III, Frances Keith Berson, and Emmy Keith Frost

Nieces:  Jo Buckley, Emmy F. Phillips, Mary Elizabeth O’Brian

Nephews:  Walter Keith IV, Samuel M. Keith, Hamilton Frost

Biography

Miss Keith’s great-grandmother, Mrs. Samuel J. Keith, was a Founder of The Old Woman’s Home and President of The Board of Directors of The Old Woman’s Home for over twenty years.

Miss Keith attended Stokes School and Peabody University.  Her favorite classes were in Fine Arts.  She was a member of First Presbyterian Church.  She was a gifted artist, an avid reader and an animal lover.  In her younger days, Miss Keith enjoyed horseback riding and traveling with her grandmother to attend the opera.  They visited many cities including Atlanta and Washington D.C.  Miss Keith collected recordings of famous opera singer.

She took care of her ill mother for many years and stated “It was the busiest time of her life.”  Miss Keith lived with her parents until they had to breakup housekeeping due to her mother’s ill health.  “I know where I’m going, “ she announced without hesitation.

Miss Keith had never had her hair cut before moving to The West End Home For Ladies and it was long enough to sit on.  She stated that she loved it short.  She enjoyed reading Taylor Caldwell books, attending the tea parties hosted by the Auxiliary to the West End Home, and attending Betty Nance’s Bible study.  Miss Keith was affectionately known as Culla and remembered for her kindness, humor and warm humanity.

Muriel C. King
October 2, 1913 – September 28, 2005
Marital Status: Divorced

Place of Birth:  Owenton, Kentucky
Parents:  William Elmer King of Long Ridge, Kentucky and Susan Mary Simpson King of Keefer, Kentucky
Spouse:

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies December 14, 1992
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site:  Owenton Cemetery in Owenton, Kentucky

Family References

Siblings:  Keppel W. King and Lela Harrison Henry

Nephew:  Elmer Terrence Henry of St. Petersburg, Florida

Great-Nieces:  Linda S. Henry and Beverly D. Henry

Biography

Miss King’s father was a farmer and her mother was a housewife.  Her mother passed away in 1921 from the flu.   Miss King moved to Nashville, Tennessee in 1960, where she resided until May 1983 when she moved to Florida for two years, returning to Nashville in October 1985.  Miss King was employed by National Life Insurance Company and was also a volunteer at Baptist Hospital.  Her hobbies were needlework and reading.

The Ladies of The West End Home published a newsletter which was written entirely by the Ladies.  Miss King was a member of the West End Home For Ladies Newsletter Staff and wrote a short column entitled “My Dad” describing some of the characteristics that made him special to her.

Each of the Ladies had a “Buddy” from the Auxiliary of The West End Home For Ladies.  Mrs. King’s Buddy was Grace Bathrick.  Mrs. Bathrick remembers Miss King as “easy to visit…except you had to get in line: everybody loved her“.  Miss King was acquainted with Mrs. Bathrick’s husband through his affiliation with her employer.

From The West End Home For Ladies Newsletter July 2000

My Dad

The June issue of Reader’s Digest contained an article entitled, “Things I Learned from Dad.”  When reading this article I immediately thought of my own father and the many characteristics which made him so special.  Space will permit my listing only a few.

My father was a generous and unselfish man.  He was sincere and he was loyal.  He respected truth and honesty and expected no less from others.  Though he was kind and considerate, he could be stern at times, if the occasion demanded it.  He was courageous.  He knew no fear, yet he was not ashamed to shed a tear.  He was a God fearing man who loved his family and was respected by his community. 

What more wonderful legacy could a father leave for his children!  I lost my father when I was twenty-five years old and I still miss him terribly.

Blessed memories!  How could we exist without them?

By:  Muriel King

Moselle Florence Martin
January 25, 1911 – April 21, 2006
Marital Status: Divorced

Place of Birth:  Camden, Tennessee
Parents:  James Oscar Florence and Maude Garner Florence, both of Benton County, Tennessee
Spouse:  George Elgin Martin

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies in 1998
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site:  Woodlawn Memorial Park

Family References

Children:  James E. Martin of Jamestown, North Carolina and George Martin

Grandchildren:  Linda Williams

Biography

Mrs. Martin’s father was employed by the railroad.  Mrs. Martin helped all seven of her siblings complete their education.  She studied Latin in high school for four years.  Mrs. Martin and her husband divorced after approximately twenty years.  Mr. Martin passed away in July 1984.

In 1940, a tornado picked up her home, moved it a short distance and dropped it twisted, distorted and burning in three places.  She and her two sons were  fortunate to get out, although they lost everything except the clothes they were wearing.  Mrs. Martin was a housewife until her sons started school, at which time she was employed as a Data Processing Supervisor at National Life Insurance Company.  She worked hard to pay for her two son’s education at Vanderbilt University.

Mrs. Martin was a lifelong member of the Church of Christ and attended services at Central Church of Christ. Her hobbies included reading, sewing, knitting, and watching television.  She loved nature.  Mrs. Martin was an active volunteer and organized the first Hot Meal Program For Needy Families through public schools at McEwen, Tennessee.  Her son stated that when he was young, his mother made blankets and gave them away to needy people.  She was also active in the PTA at her son’s schools.

Marion Elizabeth Cole Moore (Bettye)
May 2, 1923 – August 5, 2009
Marital Status: Married

Place of Birth:  Nashville, Tennessee
Parents:  William Cornelius Cole and Bessie Ada Ligon Cole
Spouse:  Charles Edward Moore

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies January 5, 1989
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site:  Fort Myers Memorial Gardens in Fort Myers, Florida

Family References

Siblings:  L.L. Cole of Madison, Tennessee

Children:  Byron Cole Moore of Fort Myers, Florida and Charles Edward Moore, Jr. of Linden, New Jersey

Biography

One of Mrs. Moore’s childhood memories was having real candles on the Christmas tree.  Her parents never burned them unless the entire family was in the room.

Mr. and Mrs. Moore were married on November 3, 1940.  Mr. Moore was a manager for the Railway Express Agency and retired after thirty years of service.  He passed away on February 5, 1984.  Mrs. Moore’s employment include Office Manager for R.E.A. Express in Lexington, Tennessee, Clerical for R.E.A. Express in Meridian Mississippi, and she managed the Tides Motel in Ft. Myers, Florida.  While living in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida they discovered Sanibel Island and hoped to one day retire there.  There next move was to Ft. Myers, Florida where they retired after managing that office until 1976.  After six years of retirement on Captiva Island, Mrs. Moore lost her husband and lived with her son and his family in Ft. Myers for five years before moving to The West End Home For Ladies.

Mrs. Moore was the Red Cross Chairman and was also a parent volunteer while her two sons were in school.  She was a member of the Methodist Church for sixty years and later became a member of the Baptist Church.  Mrs. Moore attended services at Temple Baptist Church in Fort Myers, Florida and later attended Belmont Heights Baptist Church in Nashville, Tennessee.  She stated that “Starting each day with a devotion was special in our house.”

While living at The Home, one of her favorite activities was Bingo and she was able to keep up with three or four cards at once.  Mrs. Moore was always the first to be seated for Bible study and was a great participant. She also enjoyed reading, making flower arrangements, crossword and jigsaw puzzles, music programs, arts and crafts, traveling, and talking about her family.  Mrs. Moore stated:  “Nashville is my home and returning here with the members of my family still living has been wonderful for me.  I believe God has led me to the place He knew I should be.”

In April 2009, the Ladies moved to a specially constructed wing of The Blakeford at Green Hills and the West End Home For Ladies at Vanderbilt Place was permanently closed.  The Foundation continued to support the Ladies for the remainder of their lives.  Mrs. Moore was a contributor to The West End Home For Ladies Newsletter and in the April 2003 issue shared memories from her life in an article titled Remembering When. 

Memories of Our Ladies

Memories of former Auxiliary members of The West End Home For Ladies:  “Bingo was a big deal at the Vanderbilt Place Home.  A member of the staff, Alfred, set up tables and chairs.  Bettye Moore -she was so cute- was in charge of Bingo and she supervised the set up.  Each Bingo night, Volunteers brought five prizes:  one for each of the four games and one for a tie.”

Mrs. Moore is fondly remembered by members of the Board of Directors for “fluffing” the flowers at the West End Home.  She enjoyed dressing for meals wearing flamboyant earrings “just for fun”.  Her soft voice and ready smile are greatly missed.

Excerpt from Remembering When by Bettye Moore

At my age, “remembering when” goes far back in time.

For some reason as a very young child, I vividly recall a visit to my Daddy’s Aunt Hannah and her husband.  To me, they seemed so old; but what excitement awaited me!  They owned a horse drawn carriage and driver.  We were driven to downtown Nashville in the carriage to see the sights.  My first and never to be forgotten trip in the “style of that period”!

My uncle married my best friend’s mother’s sister and we spent many weekends with them.  For hours we viewed pictures through a stereoscope.  That was a treat!

Some Saturdays spent with friends, meant one, sometimes two 10-cent movies.  Daddy took us to the movies and picked us up.

Encyclopedia salesmen called at our door and I received a set of Compton’s to start school.  I seem to recall Mother was in a bit of trouble, as I was so young.  She explained, they were also for my two older brothers.

Dorothy Ellen Lish Osteen
July 16, 1903 – April 1, 2000
Marital Status: Married

Place of Birth:
Parents:
Spouse:  Leslie Reid Osteen

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies July 5, 1991
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site:  Woodlawn Memorial Park

Biography

Mr. and Mrs. Osteen were married in Nashville, Tennessee on September 30, 1927.  Mrs. Osteen was still driving at the age of ninety-three.

Emaline Waller Pennington
December 29, 1920 – May, 29, 2000
Marital Status: Married

Place of Birth:  Decalb County, Tennessee
Parents:
Spouse:  John Pennington

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies October 24, 1995
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site:

Family References

Children:  John Pennington of Las Vegas, Nevada and Mary Pennington of Nashville, Tennessee

Biography

Mrs. Pennington was one of seven siblings, having four brothers and two sisters.  She and her husband had been married for fifty-five years at the time of his death.

With the help of her daughter, Mrs. Pennington was the first Editor of The West End Home For Ladies monthly newsletter.  In memory of her service to the newsletter, the Ladies honored her with a permanent monthly column in each month’s issue in her name.  The Home held a “Name the Column ” contest and the top three titles were given to Mrs. Pennington’s daughter for the deciding vote.  Her daughter chose “Emaline’s Excerpts” as the title and it contained quotes with wit and wisdom about life.  While living at The Home she enjoyed the day trips taken by the Ladies, as well as the weekly Bible Study class.  She also enjoyed playing Bingo, and crafts.

Memories of Our Ladies

The Ladies of The West End Home said:  “Emaline was a true friend and a woman of high character.  She will be missed by all.”

Minnie Marie Khone Pike
May 22, 1914 – December 5, 2009
Marital Status: Married

Place of Birth:  Manila, Arkansas
Parents:  Benjamin Franklin Khone of Missouri and Nola Newkirk Khone of Arkansas
Spouse:  Ldee Pike

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies in July 1995
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place, later in The Blakeford at Green Hills
Burial Site:  Bordeaux Memorial Garden

Family References

Siblings:  Viola Khone Madison

Children:  Ldee Pike, Jr. of Xenia, Ohio amd Wynona Marie Pike Brazil of Goodlettsville, Tennessee

Grandchildren:  Mrs. Dean Dyer of Gallatin, Tennessee and Vickie Ledbetter of Goodlettsville, Tennessee

Biography

Mrs. Pike was the second oldest of six siblings, having two brothers and three sisters.  Mrs. Pike’s family called her by the nickname “Mouse”.  She was born without nasal passages and was not expected to live.  She fooled everyone and lived to be ninety-two.  Mrs. Pike moved to Nashville at the age of fourteen with her family.  She was a graduate of Buena Vista High School and took business courses at Hume Fogg.  In 1940, Mrs. Pike started sewing for her neighbors and continued this for over fifty years. While her children were in school, she was very active in the local PTA and was PTA Secretary for two years.   After her children were married, she was employed as a bookbinder by Southern Publishers and worked there for twenty-four years until her retirement.  She was a lifelong member of the Seventh Day Adventist Church.  Mrs. Pike enjoyed sewing, knitting, crocheting and crafts.  She was an active home volunteer for her church making party favors, VBS crafts and needlepoint crosses for the shut-ins of her church.  Mrs. Pike traveled to Haiti, the Bahamian Islands and Canada.  She also enjoyed traveling in the United States and had visited fifteen states.  Mrs. Pike was a vegetarian.

While living in The West End Home For Ladies, Mrs. Pike enjoyed going for rides, shopping, playing Bingo and clipping coupons.  She especially enjoyed music programs and loved to dance.  Mrs. Pike attended weekly Bible Study and enjoyed religious programs.  She attended church every Saturday.  In April 2009, the Ladies moved to a specially constructed wing of The Blakeford at Green Hills and The West End Home For Ladies at Vanderbilt Place was permanently closed.  The Foundation continued to support the Ladies for the remainder of their lives.

Memories of Our Ladies

Jean Farris, Past President, Board of Directors of The West End Home For Ladies, “will always remember her love of music…when the first bars were played her toes started tapping and soon she was on her feet dancing about the room.  To me, she expressed exuberance that composers would wish to inspire.  The music lifted her spirits and she was physically able to state her joy”.

Annie Rai Doyal Shaw
December 20, 1917 – June 13, 2010
Marital Status: Married

Place of Birth:  Boyce, Louisiana
Parents:  Jesse L. Doyal and Mary E. Smith Doyal
Spouse:  J.T. Shaw, Jr.

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies in 1998
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place, later in The Blakeford at Green Hills
Burial Site:  Atlanta, Louisiana

Family References

Children:  John G. Shaw of Montgomery, Louisiana, Donald W. Shaw of Montgomery, Louisiana and Mary Beth Premeaux of Nashville, Tennessee

Biography

Mrs. Shaw was employed as a receptionist by the Sisters of Mercy.  Her husband passed away on August 6, 1968.  Mrs. Shaw was a resident of Boyce for sixty years before moving to Nashville in 1976 to be closer to her daughter.   She was a lifelong member of the Methodist Church and attended services at Belmont United Methodist Church.  Mrs. Shaw was an avid reader, enjoyed music and at one time did a little crocheting and embroidery.  She was active in her church and when her children were small, spent most of her free time supporting them in their after school activities.

While living at The West End Home For Ladies, she enjoyed playing Bingo, music programs, and pet visits.  She especially enjoyed frequent visits from her daughter and her Maltese, Luka.  In April 2009, the Ladies moved to a specially constructed wing of The Blakeford at Green Hills and The West End Home For Ladies at Vanderbilt Place was permanently closed.  The Foundation continued to support the Ladies for the remainder of their lives.

Memories of Our Ladies

Mrs. Shaw is remembered by Jean Farris, Past President of The West End Home For Ladies Board of Directors, as precious, quiet, gentle, and well- read. “She had worked as a librarian and loved the peace that a comfortable chair and good book can bring. Each morning she spread the paper on her table and read it from front to back.  When asked one day what was happening in the world, she replied in her soft, quiet voice  “Not much good to read about or to tell you.”   She almost always understated what she was talking about.  For that matter I never heard an unkind word from her.  She was a caring person and quick to help when someone was having a difficult time. She loved Werther’s candy and it could be found in the many candy bowls in her room as well as a slew of unlikely places.”

Wilma Louise Short
July 3, 1922 – June 1, 2003
Marital Status: Never Married

Place of Birth:
Parents:
Spouse:

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies September 1, 1993
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site:  Little Rock Cemetery in Wrigley, Tennessee

Biography

Miss Short was employed by Saint Thomas Hospital.

Memories of Our Ladies

Each of the Ladies had a “Buddy” from the Auxiliary of The West End Home For Ladies.  Their Auxiliary Buddies were their special friends, visiting often, taking the Ladies out for some fun, and sometimes joining them for meals.  Miss Short’s Buddy was Grace Bathrick.  Mrs. Bathrick remembers Miss Short as “quiet until you drew her out“.  During Miss Short’s years as a nurse at the old St. Thomas Hospital, she was acquainted with Mrs. Bathrick’s father, Dr. Henry Carroll Smith, who was an ophthalmologist there.

Rosalyn Critser Smith
October 25, 1909 – January 11, 2008
Marital Status: Married

Place of Birth:  Webster County, Kentucky
Parents:  William B. Crister and Blanche Carlisle Crister
Spouse:  George “Jack” Lewis Smith

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies in 1999
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site:  Calhoun Cemetery in Calhoun, Kentucky

Family References

Siblings:  Carol Tomlingson of Poole, Kentucky

Children:  Terry Smith

Daughter-in-law:  Judith A. Smith

Grandchildren:  Chris Smith, Trevor Smith and Jared Smith

Nieces:  Ann Costellow and Lou Griffin

Biography

Mrs. Smith was the oldest of four siblings, having two brothers, and one sister.  Mrs. Smith attended Western Kentucky Teachers College (now Western Kentucky University) for her teaching certificate.  She taught for one year prior to her marriage.  After her husband’s death on June 2, 1960, she returned to school in Owensboro, Kentucky and achieved her LPN degree.  Mrs. Smith worked as an LPN for thirteen years prior to her retirement.  She enjoyed traveling and traveled throughout the United States and part of Canada.  Mrs. Smith was a member of Woodmont Baptist Church.

After her admission to The West Rnd Home For Ladies, she enjoyed ceramics, playing Bingo, movies and was an avid reader.

Willie Mae Huddleston Stivers
November 20, 1916 – January 11, 2006
Marital Status: Married

Place of Birth:  Sunmer County, Tennessee
Parents:  William Jasper Huddleston and Callie Katherine Streator Huddleston
Spouse:  Cecil B. Stivers

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies in 1999
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site:  Beech Cemetery in Hendersonville, Tennessee

Family References

Children:  John W. Stivers of Smyrna, Tennessee and Donald Ray Stivers

Grandchildren:  Cherie Stivers Abner

Biography

Mrs. Stivers was one of three siblings, having one brother and one sister.  Mrs. Stivers was educated in a very rural area and the highest level of education she completed was ninth grade.  She became a member of the Church of Christ in 1967.  Mr. Stivers passed away on December 6, 1977.

Prior to her admission to The West End Home For Ladies, Mrs. Stivers was friends with Marie Pike, another resident of The West End Home.

Louise Thompson Strong
February 4, 1919 – September 20, 2000
Marital Status: Married

Place of Birth:  Chattanooga, Tennessee
Parents:
Spouse:  Albert Strong

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies April 28, 1991
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site:

Biography

Mrs. Strong graduated from the University of Chattanooga in 1941 with a degree in bookkeeping.  She and her husband were married in 1941.  Mrs. Strong retired from the Auditing Department of the Nashville Symphony in 1991 and later accepted part-time employment as a bookkeeper for Leah Rose Home.  Mrs. Strong was a member of St. Timothy Lutheran Church in Hendersonville where her son-in-law was the senior minister.

After the death of her husband of 42 years, Mrs. Strong was admitted to The West End Home For Ladies.  She enjoyed knitting, cross-stitching, and needlepoint. Her needlework was described as prolific and extremely beautiful.  She was very active and interested in the other Ladies and the staff.  She especially enjoyed going on the day trips with the other Ladies.

Josephine Brashear Sweeney
October 1, 1907, August 3, 2002
Marital Status: Married

Place of Birth:  Drakesboro, Kentucky
Parents:
Spouse:  John A. Sweeney

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies December 28, 1987
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site:

Family References

Niece:  Nancy Anderson

Biography

Mrs. Sweeney’s father owned a coal mine in Drakesboro, Kentucky.  She was the youngest of three sisters.  When Mrs. Sweeney was two months old, her family moved to Owensboro, Kentucky.   Mrs. Sweeney attended Georgetown College in Georgetown, Kentucky and later transferred to Western Kentucky Teachers College.  Upon graduation, she taught music for three years at Emerson School in the Owensboro Public School System until her marriage.  The Foundation’s records include a Grade School Concert Program dated May 24, 1929 recognizing Mrs. Sweeney as Director of the Grand Orchestra’s performance of Dreamland Shadows.  After leaving the school system, she was employed by Macatee, Lydann and Ray Department Store as an Assistant Buyer.  She was promoted to Buyer after one year.  After the closing of Mcatee, Lydann and Ray, Mrs. Sweeney moved to Nashville, Tennessee and was employed by Cain Sloan Department Store.  She loved traveling and visited most of the European countries.  Mrs. Sweeney was a member of Woodmont Baptist Church.  She enjoyed listening to classical music and reading.

Mary Pauline Ray Welch
June 12, 1915 – Unknown
Marital Status: Married

Place of Birth:  Franklin, Tennessee
Parents:
Spouse:  Macon Welch

Admitted to The West End Home For Ladies November 1, 1993
Resided in The West End Home For Ladies at 2818 Vanderbilt Place
Burial Site:

Biography

Mrs. Welch was the oldest of nine children, having four brothers and four sisters.    A graduate of Isaac Litton, Mrs. Welch’s professional training and career were in the field of family and children’s services.  She was employed in the adoption department of Family Services for twenty years and at Florence Critten for four years.  Mrs. Welch’s volunteer work included Cohn High School, Tennessee Mental Health and Senior Citizens.  She and her husband were married for thirty-two years and had three children.  Mr. Welch was ill, leaving his care and the raising of their children to Mrs. Welch.  She enjoyed going to yard sales, dancing, crocheting and counted cross stitch embroidery.

Mrs. Welch withdrew from The West End Home For Ladies in 2001.

Excerpt from the April 1998 West End Home For Ladies Newsletter written by Mrs. Welch:

“I felt that I needed and could find “My Time” at The West End Home For Ladies.  I could sleep a little later, walk a little slower, and still be accepted and loved.  To sum it up, yesterday’s worry about tomorrow has become today’s happiness for me!”